The Bouquet Toss – How To Catch The Bouquet

Bouquet Toss - Tossing The Bouquet - Wedding Customs
The bouquet toss, you know that fun custom during the wedding reception when the bride throws a bouquet to all the single ladies, didn’t start out so jovial and fun.

The practice of the bride tossing her bouquet originated in 14th century Europe. At that time, the belief was that all brides and everything they touched was lucky. By merely touching a bride, or getting a piece of something she touched, wore, or carried would give a person a little bit of that luck.

A very unromantic concept – as the bride was often aggressively chased, guests tearing at her dress and bouquet in the hopes of obtaining some of her luck. Eventually brides began throwing bits of their bouquets to the crazy crowd.

This new practice of tearing apart her own bouquet to throw to several people eventually transformed to the bouquet toss practice we know today. Bride’s used to toss their own bouquet, but this eventually turned into a small toss bouquet, allowing the bride to keep hers. Instead of getting some of the bride’s luck, whoever catches it will be the next to marry.

Tossing the bouquet is the easy part. Just be wary of low ceilings or the bouquet will be bounced directly down to the floor instead of reaching the intended target – the single ladies.

Catching it takes some finesse.

Check out this entertaining infographic from our friends at Larson Jewelers which gives the single ladies an easy (and amusing) how-to and tips to increase their odds of a successful bouquet catch.


The Ultimate Guide to Catching the Bouquet Like a Lady - LarsonJewelers.com - Infographic

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

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For planning help and unique ideas for your wedding contact me at jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net or at 937-235-2586 or 937-581-3647!

Wedding Q & A – When Are Aisle Runners Used in a Wedding?

Bride's processional with her father, entering wedding ceremony on a traditional white aisle runner
Photo credit: Childers Photography

Q. – When is an aisle runner used?

A. – The use of aisle runners at wedding ceremonies originated centuries ago.

The three main reasons for their use were:

1) Out of superstition – it provides a barrier between the bride and any evil spirits that may come up from below the ground

2) The bride was considered “royalty” and an aisle runner prevents her from having to walk directly on the ground

3) Cleanliness – since roads were unpaved and guests would track in dirt and mud an aisle runner kept the bride from dragging the hem of her gown and her train through the dirt

These days it is done out of tradition. When asked to imagine a bride walking down the aisle, most people imagine her walking on a white aisle runner.

bride and groom's wedding ceremony recessional, walking on traditional white aisle runner
Photo credit: Faye Sommer Photography

When is the aisle runner put in place?

A wedding aisle runner is most commonly put in place after the mothers of the bride and the groom have entered, and before the ceremony processional (when the bridal party enters).

Groomsmen putting traditional white wedding ceremony aisle runner in place
Photo credit: Shiloh Photography

It is secured at the front of the aisle with pins and tape so it can be easily unrolled, then, once completely unrolled, is secured at the back so it won’t roll back up which helps prevent anyone from tripping.

Sometimes couples prefer to have the aisle runner already in place before the start of the ceremony.

In this case, the center aisle is blocked with ribbon preventing guests from walking on the runner, and guests are seated from the outside aisles (not the center aisle). The ribbon is removed right before the moms are escorted in.

There are many options for aisle runner styles. The most common and economical are made from a durable heavy-weight plastic or rayon. You can find these in the wedding section of some craft stores or in a floral supply store. You can also get them from your florist.

You may also want to read: Alternatives to the White Aisle Runner

Aisle runners can also be personalized, with your names, monogram, or a romantic saying. They can even coordinate with your wedding colors or season.


Photo credit: Faye Sommer Photography

Be extra careful when using an aisle runner for an outdoor wedding ceremony. Since ground is rarely smooth and level (even the best manicured lawns will have some minor bumps and soft spots. May not be easily seen, but easy to find with your foot and potentially wobble, trip, or sprain an ankle).

For an outdoor ceremony, either omit the use of an aisle runner for safety’s sake, or choose one that is more durable such as a carpet runner (can be found in different colors and patterns), or heavy fabric such as burlap.

Make sure to get the length of the aisle before purchasing an aisle runner. They come in 25′ increments, starting at 25′ long and going up to 150′ or more.

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

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Want fun ideas for your wedding? Weddings From The Heart can help. Contact me today at jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net, 937-235-2586 or 937-581-3647!

Old, New, Borrowed and Blue – Origins and Meanings of This Familiar Rhyme

lucky sixpence
“Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue”

Something Old, New, Borrowed, Blue – We all know that singsong rhyme but may not know where it came from or what it means. Most brides just buy a blue garter and hope that covers it.

But the traditions surrounding it are quite charming.

The something old is usually covered by the bride choosing a piece of jewelry or other accessory to represent the chain of happiness flowing from one generation to another. When a bride uses her mother’s wedding gown or other family heirloom she is recognizing that this item symbolizes the ties between generations of family.

The something new is the marriage itself. It is symbolized by wearing something new (a new wedding gown or new earrings for example) that helps bring good fortune and success to this new union.

International Wedding Customs

The something borrowed is usually on loan from a married friend or family member to help bring happiness to the new bride. The something borrowed item can be a piece of wedding attire (like a veil), jewelry, or even a handkerchief or family bible.

The something blue belongs to a tradition which dates back to biblical times when blue stood for purity and fidelity.

The English addition of the phrase “and a sixpence in your shoe,” is a favorite. If a bride places a coin in her left shoe, it is said to ensure wealth and that she will always have money.

Looking for unique ideas for your wedding? Weddings From The Heart can help. Contact me today at jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net or at 937-235-2586 or 937-581-3647!

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

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Photo Credit: Jo Ann Snover | Dreamstime.com

Why We Do That – Origins of Popular Wedding Ceremony Traditions

A wedding ceremony is a wonderful event – a rite-of-passage full of ritual and symbolism.

Have you ever wondered where these rituals and practices come from and why we do these things? Here are the origins of some common wedding ceremony traditions.

The White Wedding Gown
queen victoria - white wedding gown

We can thank Queen Victoria for the tradition of wearing a white wedding gown. She was the first to wear a white satin and lace dress for her wedding to Prince Albert in 1840.

Colored gowns were common at the time as white fabric was considered impractical (hard to come by, and hard to keep clean). Many brides wore their “Sunday Best.”

Enter Queen Victoria. She had some beautiful lace that she wanted incorporated into her wedding gown. The final product was made of white satin. Although she wasn’t the first royal bride to wear a white gown, it was her choice of attire that caught on and inspired brides to be married in white.

Today, while most brides still opt for the white gown, it’s not unusual to see non-white wedding gowns. Vera Wang’s fall 2014 bridal collection featured various shades of pink, including rose, coral and peony; and she also created bridal collections of red and black.

Bridesmaids Dressing Alike

bridesmaids dressing alike

Centuries ago, all of the women, including the bride, dressed alike, not just the bridesmaids. This was to confuse the evil spirits who lurked around. The evil spirits intended to cause harm and ill will to the bride. Since everyone was dressed the same, the evil spirits couldn’t tell who was the bride, and so were unable to cause any harm or mischief.

The Ceremony Processional

wedding ceremony processional

wedding ceremony processional

wedding ceremony processional

The ceremony starts with the processional, the formal entering of the wedding party.

Many couples have only the bride’s attendants walk in during the ceremony processional (with the groom’s attendants coming out with the groom and officiant), however having the entire wedding party enter as couples is perfectly acceptable. It’s your preference.

The processional dates back hundreds of years ago when a wedding ceremony was preceded by dancing (celebrating the joy of life) to the ceremony locale. Through the years the dancing evolved into the modern processional.

With This Ring

wedding rings

During the ceremony, couples exchange wedding rings.

The practice of exchanging wedding rings dates back thousands of years to the Romans, Egyptians, and Greeks.

The symbolism of the wedding ring originated with the Egyptians. A ring is round, with no beginning and no end. It represents eternity and the never-ending love of the couple.

In ancient Rome and Greece, wedding rings were used to represent a promise of fidelity.

International Wedding Customs

Sealed With A Kiss

wedding kiss

Who can forget the kiss when the couple are pronounced husband and wife? We can thank the Ancient Romans for this as they sealed contracts with a kiss. Also, it was believed that as a couple kiss, their breath intermingles, therefore giving each other a little bit of their souls.

Decorating The Getaway Car

decorating the getaway car

Tying shoes to the back of the getaway car dates back to ancient Assyrian, Hebrew and Egyptian cultures where exchanging shoes sealed an agreement or contract.

Tin cans were later used although it is unclear as to when this practice began). It was thought that the clanking sound would scare away any evil spirits.

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

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If you’re looking for fun ideas or help with your wedding plans, contact me today at jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net or at 937-235-2586 or 937-581-3647!

Photo Credits:

Queen Victoria – unknown

Bridesmaid walking down aisle, and
Bride and father walking down aisle
Jeff Schaefer Photography

Stargazer lily with rings, and
First kiss
Sandra Reed Photography

Bride with bridesmaids,
Wedding party lined up for processional, and
Decorated vehicle
Weddings From The Heart