Wedding Photographs: Dos & Don’ts

Your wedding is a day you will spend a huge amount of time planning, but relatively little time actually doing. Months of preparation go into a single day, so of course, you’re going to want wonderful photos to help preserve the memory of your special day for the rest of your life.

If you want to ensure those photos are the best that they can possibly be, you will find the following list of wedding photography “dos” and “don’ts” helpful.

DO: Hire A Professional Photographer

Wedding Photographer At Work - Wedding Photographs Dos and Don'ts

Image source: wikimedia

The idea of hiring a professional photographer may be an expense you don’t think your budget can spare, but remember: these are the photographs you will cherish for the rest of your life.

The importance of having a professional eye capturing the moment for posterity cannot be overstated. Professional photographers know exactly how to produce the perfect shot, so you can be guaranteed excellent quality, and images you’ll delight in looking back on 50 years from now.

DON’T: Go Too Heavy On The Photoshop

Every so often, an article emerges mocking “bad” wedding photographs. As far as we’re concerned, if the bride and groom like the photographs, then no one else’s opinion matters.

But if you want to avoid the problems often depicted in these lists, it’s vital that you go easy on the PhotoShop during the editing process. Talk to your photographer and stipulate PhotoShop should only be used to correct photography issues, such as bad lighting, rather than as a tool to produce entirely new (and often downright bizarre) scenes.

DO: Opt For Candid Over Posed Photographs

Of course, you will want to assemble for a number of classic posed photographs; you with your bridesmaids, you and your new husband or wife with your respective parents, and so on. However, the best wedding photographs are often candids; moments captured when you didn’t even realize a camera was pointing at you.

Skilled professionals like Clewell Photography know how to capture these quiet moments, preserving small memories alongside the standard posed offerings.

DON’T: Discourage Your Guests From Taking Photos

camera - wedding photography - wedding photographs dos and don'ts

Image source: pixabay

Surveys have suggested that many couples are unhappy when photos of their wedding are have been posted to social media. This has resulted in brides-to-be deciding to ban guests from taking photos altogether. The idea behind these bans is to ensure quality control, and guarantee no unflattering images are circulated without the couple’s express agreement, or a photo of the wedding gown is posted before the ceremony has even taken place.

While you may like the idea of that kind of absolute control, weddings are all about uniting with your family and friends in celebration – so it’s natural they’re going to want to capture the moment and share it with others. A mixture of excellent professional photographs and ardent amateur efforts will ensure that the entire day is captured through different eyes, giving you a wide range of experiences and moments on (digital) film. Sure, some of those photos might not be particularly flattering, but that’s all in the good spirit of the day.

If you keep the above dos and don’ts in mind, you can be sure that you will always look back on your wedding photographs with delight and pride.

* This is a contributed post

I hope you found this information useful!

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

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For planning help and unique ideas for your wedding call or text me at 937-581-3647, or email me at jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net!

Think You’re “Naive” About Wedding Planning? Don’t Feel Bad.

Confused Bride, Naive Bride

Not too long ago, I came across this question, “In what ways are brides and grooms naïve during the wedding planning process?”

First of, we need to understand why many couples are “naïve.”

It has absolutely nothing to do with their intelligence, or ability to comprehend. Instead it’s more like the saying, “You don’t know what you don’t know.”

Think of it this way – it’s highly unlikely that you’ve ever planned an event on this scale before. A wedding is two events (ceremony AND reception) with special attire, special décor, dinner, entertainment . . . So. Many. Details.

Wedding Reception With Decor, Centerpiece, and Food

Sooooo, if you haven’t done something before, how can you know and understand (or be expected to know and understand) all the ins and outs? (BTW – This reasoning can apply to anybody, not just those planning a wedding).

Ok, so in what ways can brides and grooms not fully understand the ins and outs?

Often, couples:

Underestimate the Time Involved
One way that they are “naïve” is that they usually aren’t thinking beyond the 6 – 7 hours of the event itself.

Among other things, there are preparations that need to take place prior to the wedding day on the part of the caterer (food purchasing and prep for their wedding menu), and the wedding coordinator (including timeline creation and vendor confirmations). Also, after the fact – the work for the photographer and videographer isn’t done at the end of the reception (they have hours of editing, creating photo layouts, etc.)

Or the couple has misjudged the timing of the day.

Have you ever heard that 1 hour of “wedding time” is equivalent to 1 ½ hours of “real time” (meaning things will take 1 ½ times longer than anticipated on your wedding day)? Believe it. Things will take longer – from getting ready, to eating dinner, and doing a receiving line.

Wanting to do a receiving line for your 150 guests, then finish after-ceremony photos, (including both sides of the family), then a quick stop at that cute garden for a quick pic of just the two of you, AND get to the reception within an hour? Not gonna happen.

Another area of underestimating time is with DIY projects.

We’ve all seen those funny “nailed it” pictures on Facebook. You know the ones with the original picture of how it’s supposed to look next to the photo of the crazy mess of how it turned out. The “crazy mess” is the result of the project needing more time to properly execute, and/or the person not truly knowing how to properly execute the project.

Which leads us to:

Have Limited Knowledge
Back to “You don’t know what you don’t know.” We base our plans on what we know, or at least what we think we know. Unless it’s an area of expertise, there will be gaps in this knowledge.

A perfect example is with flowers. Unless you are a florist or have worked extensively with flowers, your flower knowledge is probably limited. Don’t feel bad. Even after being in the wedding business for over 20 years, my flower knowledge is still limited, (although I have learned a lot through the years).

Anyway, like most people, you probably know the names of flowers such as roses, lilies, and daisies, but not much beyond those few popular flowers, or a particular flower that you’ve really loved for years. Because of this, most people are unfamiliar with what flowers are in season, and what flowers are hearty enough to stay fresh throughout the entire event, and not be wilted halfway through the reception.

Incorrectly Use Tools
Also, many get too caught up in what they see on tv and online, particularly with Pinterest and styled shoots. Don’t shoot me for saying that. I actually love seeing stylized shoots, and am a Pinterest junkie.

weddings from the heart interest board

But for those of you who are planning your wedding, you need to understand and use tools such as Pinterest as ways to get ideas and inspiration. Then weed through those ideas and bits of inspiration to hone, craft, and build upon to create a wedding that really represents you and your fiancé.

Unfortunately, rather than using these as tools for inspiration and starting points for their own ideas, many couples try to recreate what they see exactly as it appears in the photos.

Stylized Wedding Shoot

There are two problems with this desire and attempt to recreate. 1) There’s no personalization. It completely takes “you” out of the equation because you weren’t there (or even thought about) when it was created; and 2) The expense. Most couples don’t realize the time and expense it took to produce that one look (particularly for a stylized shoot). The specialty items (linens, vases, plates, glassware) and custom-made items can get expensive when trying to recreate the desired table-look for 15 – 20 tables.

How to Avoid the Naïveté?

1) As vendors, we need to continually share our knowledge and wisdom, if you will, with couples so they become educated, and have the opportunity to learn and understand what they need to know for their own event.

2) As brides and grooms, couples need to delve deeper than what’s on the surface, ask questions, and trust what their vendors are telling them, so they can be educated consumers.

Do they have to learn all there is to know about weddings? Of course not. (Guess what? That’s an impossible feat, even for the professionals). But a little bit of knowledge goes a long way.

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

For planning help and unique ideas for your wedding contact me at jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net or at 937-235-2586 or 937-581-3647!

Photo credit (confused bride): ljupco / 123RF Stock Photo

Bride & Groom Q & A – Invitation Wording

invitation names wordingQ – I have a question about my wedding invitation wording. Whose names are supposed to go on the invitation? My FMIL wants their names on there too, but they’re not paying for the wedding!

A – Some people are under the belief that besides the names of the bride and groom, the only other names that are allowed to be listed on the invitation are the bride’s parents, and this is only if they’re paying for the wedding. If the groom’s parents are mentioned as well, they think that it will imply that they are also paying.

Are You Coming? – What to Do When Your Guests Don’t RSVP

But simply having their names on the invitation is not the case. Instead, it is where the names are placed on the invitation that indicates who is hosting, and usually, but not always, paying.

“Mr. and Mrs. Jason Smith request the honour of your presence at marriage of their daughter” clearly indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Smith are doing the inviting, hosting and probably paying.

Having “son of Mr. and Mrs. William Jones” following the groom’s name is merely acknowledging (and honoring) his parents. Having their names here indicates that they are not issuing the invitations, they are not hosting, and they are not paying.

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

For more tips and ideas for your wedding, contact me at jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net or at 937-235-2586 or 937-581-3647!